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otters in japanese folklore

Oni (demons) and yurei (ghosts) have played a role in Japanese culture for thousands of years, and stories of new spirits continue to be told today. The Japanese river otter (Japanese: ニホンカワウソ(日本川獺 ー, Hepburn: Nihon-kawauso) (Lutra lutra whiteleyi) is an extinct variety of otter formerly widespread in Japan. Navigation Menu. Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Otters In Japanese folklore. It is about the consequences of greed and jealousy. Much of … https://yokai.fandom.com/wiki/Kawauso?oldid=9519. In Japanese folklore, they fool humans like the fox (kitsune) and tanuki. In Japanese, otters are called "kawauso" (獺、川獺). The population suddenly shrank in the 1930s, and the mammal nearly vanished. They are also said to shapeshift into severed heads and get caught in fishing nets. In the Noto region, Ishikawa Prefecture, there are stories where they shapeshift into beautiful women or children wearing checker-patterned clothing, and if a human attempts to speak to one, they will answer "oraya" and then answer "araya," and if anybody asks them anything, then they say cryptic things like "kawai," and there are also dreadful stories like the one in the Kaga Province (now Ishikawa Prefecture) where an otter that lives in the castle's moat would shapeshift into a woman, invite males, and eat and kill them. Kawauso (獺, Kawauso) is the Japanese term for the river otter, but can become a yokai when it lives at an exceptionally long life. The 13 extant otter species are all semiaquatic, aquatic or marine, with diets based on fish and invertebrates. Greek mythology is known for its variety of mixed-up monsters — e.g. 7) Tsuchigumo. Otter information, Habitat, Feeding, Anatomy, Reproduction, PredatorsFacts about Sea Otter, Giant Otter, European Otter, African Otter and River Otter. Yokai Wiki is a FANDOM Lifestyle Community. In Japanese folklore, they fool humans like the fox (kitsune) and tanuki. In the Ishikawa and Kochi Prefectures, they are also said to be a type of kappa, and there are stories told about how they engage in sumo with otters. In Japanese folklore, they fool humans in the same way as foxes and tanuki. In the Tsugaru region, Aomori Prefecture, they are said to possess humans, and it is said that those possessed by otters would lose their stamina as if their soul has been extracted. In Japanese folklore Otters were considered very dangerous as they would shapeshift into beautiful women or little children and kill men. In Celtic and other folklore the otter is often characterised as a friendly and helpful creature, and is given the name ‘water dog’, alluding to these qualities. In the Noto region, Ishikawa Prefecture, there are stories where they … In the Tsugaru region, Aomori Prefecture, they are said to possess humans, and it is said that those possessed by otters would lose their stamina as if their soul has been extracted. Since then, it has only been spotted several times, in 1964 in the Seto Inland Sea, and in the Uwa Sea in … Japanese culture tells a number of tales involving otters, many of them involving shape shifting. They are said to play pranks on people when they shape shift, often involving the otter … Dating back to the 1880s, it was … Many species of otter are either threatened or endangered. Kawauso (獺, Kawauso) is the Japanese term for the river otter, but can become a yokai when it lives at an exceptionally long life. the manticore, which has a lion's body, bat wings, and a human head — but they have nothing on Japan. In Japanese folklore Otters were considered very dangerous as they would shapeshift into beautiful women or little children and kill men. In the Kagakushū, a dictionary from the Muromachi period, an otter that grew old becomes a kappa. In Japanese folklore, they fool humans like the fox (kitsune) and tanuki. "Shita-kiri suzume" means "tongue-cut sparrow" and is a very famous tale in Japanese folklore. In Japanese, they are called “kawauso” . In China, like in Japan, there are stories where otters would shapeshift into beautiful women in old books like In Search of the Supernatural and the Zhenyizhi (甄異志). In the Kashima District and the Hakui District in Ishikawa Prefecture, they are seen as a yōkai under the name kabuso or kawaso, and they perform pranks like extinguishing the fire of the paper lanterns of people who walk on roads at night, shapeshift into a beautiful woman of 18–19 years of age and fool people, or fool people and make them try to engage in sumo against a rock or a tree stump It is said that they speak human words, and sometimes people would be called and stop while walking on roads. Otters are a popular animal in Japanese folklore … The Japanese are very much into their spirits. The Japanese river otter (Japanese: ニホンカワウソ(日本川獺 ー, Hepburn: Nihon-kawauso) (Lutra lutra whiteleyi) is an extinct variety of otter formerly widespread in Japan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_legendary_creatures_from_Japan In the Kashima District and the Hakui District in Ishikawa Prefecture, they are seen as a yōkai under the name kabuso or kawaso, and they perform pranks like extinguishing the fire of the paper lanterns of people who walk on roads at night, shapeshift into a beautiful woman of 18–19 years of age and fool people, or fool people and make them try to engage in sumo against a rock or a tree stump It is said that they speak human words, and sometimes people would be called and stop while walking on roads.

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