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dwarf cavendish banana

M. acuminata 'Dwarf Cavendish' is similar to M. basjoo as it lends itself well as a garden plant In temperate regions, its size is more compact but again no familiar fruit will be produced in the short term and it doesn't do particularly well if kept indoors all year long. If growing your own bananas is your aim, outside of a warm zone you must provide artificial heat and lighting in Winter. If you own a Dwarf Cavendish or have a curiously about buying one then you will already know they are a delight, especially if you treat them right. Musa or the Banana is one of the most well known fruits in the world, as well as being delicious and nutritious some varieties can be grown easily and effectively as houseplants. Normal potting compost at this stage is all you need. Water when the top 4cm / 2 inches of compost is dry. A vigorous banana tree with wider green leaves. This is down to its large leaf surface area which allows a lot of transpiration to take place - a good thing in the dry atmosphere of a centrally heated home. This is the tell tale sign you have a true Dwarf Cavendish. Although true Banana plants are far too large for any house, the Dwarf Musa Banana, or Dwarf Cavendish, fits right in. Young plants will have these blotches although as they mature they will disappear. However if you use home made compost or animal manure it must be well rotted. An established plant will need copious watering during the warmest months. The really amazing thing is that they flower and fruit when just 4 feet tall. Quite beautiful and unusual in appearance, but at the end of the day they're uncommon indoors. The leaves are delicate so if you wash them be careful and avoid leafshine products. The variety you have and the growing environment you provide will determine the eventual height. 'Dwarf Cavendish' fühlt sich an dauerwarmen, luftfeuchten und sonnigen Plätzen bei stets leicht feuchter Erde in Wintergärten oder hellen Wohnräumen besonders wohl. Keeping the plant in a container that is too small, not feeding or generally being "cruel" will mean the maximum height will never be achieved (which might be your intention if space is sparse). Although heat pockets, or sun traps such as in between windows and curtains should be avoided as they often heat up too rapidly for the plant to adapt. From the beginner to the more experienced, there's something for everyone. These "Dwarfs" can still easily reach 6ft / 2m, so with this in mind a young new plant will live happily on a window ledge for a few years at most but that's it, afterwards the space will have run out and you will need somewhere bigger. Overwatering is actually quite difficult to achieve, but if you are watering too much and the temperature is cold you will increase the probability of rot drastically. It will also tolerate being kept indoors all year round. Do not fertilise when the plant isn't growing or if you don't want to support any new growth, for example if it's already overgrown and further height is undesired. Immaculate leaves are rare, however you can reduce the blemishes by keeping the plant in a protected spot away from children, pets and strong draughts. They can of course be grown in other rooms of the house, but a conservatory is an ideal situation, often giving humid, bright and spacious living accommodation which this plant craves and ultimately needs in order to do well. Genus Musa are suckering evergreen perennials with very large, paddle-shaped leaves whose stalk-bases form a false stem, and clusters of tubular flowers with colourful bracts, followed by cylindrical fruits . This type … A more sinister cause might be down to pests, in particular those which secrete honeydew such as aphids. Feeding, copious watering and large containers are necessary and don't even think about keeping them in a cold room over Winter or your Banana Plant will be a mushy mess by Spring. see more; Family Musaceae . Warmer climates enable vigorous growth when this tree planted in the ground, but because our Cavendish is uniquely dwarf-sized, it also thrives when it's container planted. The leaves might look tough but are actually very delicate and will rip easily if certain conditions are poor. They can of course be grown in other rooms of the house, but a conservatory is an ideal situation, often giving humid, bright and spacious living … Whilst there are more than 1,000 banana varieties in the world, the Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata ‘Dwarf Cavendish’) populates supermarket shelves and makes up almost the entire global export market. Guttation is the most likely reason - after the plant has been watered well, in the morning you may find water droplets have collected at the leaf tips. You can of course use a feed designed for house plants too. Young plants and new leaves may scorch in full Summer sun especially if your watering routine is stingy. Keeping the humidity high will deter Red Spider Mite however if they strike they can be treated with an insecticide. It's normal for leaves to become blemished and ripped from general knocking or even low humidity levels. It's almost like the Banana plant expects its leaves to be damaged, so it spends its days churning out new ones so quickly the plant doesn't spend any time making them tougher. Young plants, also known as "pups", will fill small pots quickly so you need to repot them into bigger ones quite frequently, this may be as much as two or three times in the first year. Plant description The Cavendish banana plant is a giant herb. Often Dwarf Banana plants are found growing in parts of Asia for mass cultivation and they are sometimes grown as tall specimen plants in gardens at the back of borders to add a touch of the tropics. All bananas will enjoy being outside in the warmest months of the year, so if you can Summer them outdoors in a sheltered corner from harsh winds they will thank you for it. These banana trees have large bunches of full sized sweet smooth fruit. The Common Banana must have good light, but will actually accept a range of light conditions from part shade to full sun. Getting them is a challenge, have a read of the "flower" section to find out more. There are flowers and as you might expect they precede the rare banana fruit. Significantly cut back in Winter though otherwise you will be inviting rot to take over. When treated well, Banana plants are very fast growers - as much as one huge new leaf every week or so during the growing seasons. It often grows as a seasonal tropical foliage ornamental in cold winter regions. Plus, it only matures to 8 to 10 feet in height, so you'll be able to transport it from the patio to your kitchen or sunroom with ease. Pot bound, unfertilised and low temperatures will slow or completely stop growth. Low humidity is often a contributing factor to leaf damage so moisture retentive pellets in the drip tray would be helpful, along with a regular misting. However as they need significant Winter protection it's relatively uncommon for them to be grown like this by the average gardener. However the leaves are easily ripped and damaged so try to discourage playful pets or children from interacting with them. You will risk serious damage to the roots and rhizome if you don't use fully decomposed material. It will give you the large size aspect, quick growth along with the potential of edible fruit. The Dwarf Cavendish banana is a widely grown and commercially important Cavendish cultivar. Of course the Victorian conservatories were a little different (and significantly bigger) than the ones we have today, however the basic principle is similar.

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